Sasquatch, Our Biggest of Boys

Dark clouds swept over our house last week as we had to send off our sweet boy Sasquatch

Our biggest of boys, Sasquatch, ‘Squatch, Squatchmo, Big Dude, Bubbies, Champagne Supernova, Squatchers, Big Squatch, came into our home December 19, 2015, along with his brother Yeti, from the Hide-E-Hole ferret shelter in Pittsburgh. (You can thank Chad for talking me into their names.) I’d always wanted a big boy ferret and he certainly fit the bill!



The boys had been found surviving with a feral cat colony in Pittsburgh, during the previous winter. Sasquatch clearly had been taking care of Yeti, who was deaf, making sure he was safe until – and after – they were rescued. When we first brought them home they would sleep curled up together in a sleepy sack. Sasquatch would always have his head out, alert for any danger. Anytime they were in an unfamiliar situation, Sasquatch would revert back to that behavior, making sure Yeti was protected.



Once they settled in, ‘Squatch demonstrated his propensity for being a low-key sorta dude. He was happy to go outside and play in the grass and check out the fish pond and waterfall. Big Dude wasn’t exactly the most graceful ferret, and more than once wound up in the pond! He might dance across the waterfall, try to step on a lily pad, despite my warnings, and plop! At least he was a proficient swimmer!



Among Squatchmo’s other outdoor hobbies was trying to steal the water irises. Not really sure what he planned on doing with them, but he would seek out a nice plump water iris, streeeetch until he could get it, and yank (if it was out in the water) or chew on it, if it wasn’t. It was ridiculous!

Like most ferrets, he was a a master digger, flinging dirt far and wide when he was able to sneak into a plant, or when presented with a box full of soil. But at the Ferret Picnic when a prize was on the line, do you think he’d dig? Of course not! Silly boy. Being patient, though, he was a great contestant in the Ferret Chariot Race! Even when I wrecked the chariot and dumped him overboard!



We very nearly lost Sasquatch in December 2017. And so we knew we were on borrowed time. I only wish we’d been able to borrow more.



Sasquatch was a happy, lovey, stunning boy who left us far too soon. He was the Big Boy I’d always hoped for and our life is richer for having had him in it. Rest in peace, my Champagne Supernova.

chris on May 15th 2019 in Animals, Family

Farewell, Kimi cat….you were a good girl

It is with heavy hearts that we say goodbye to our smug, (mostly) silent, ever patient, loving, Siamese kitty Kimi.

It was ten years ago that Mom called me and asked if I could go get Kimi and take her home…temporarily. Nun-Nun, Kimi’s human, had just gone into a nursing home and poor spoiled, only pet Kimi needed someone to pay attention to her. I knew full well that temporarily meant permanently because that’s how these things tend to go.

Down to Fairmont I went only a few days before Christmas, gathered up Kimi the Silent and put her into the cat carrier. She started wailing like a banshee.

I called Mom from the car, “Hey, I have Kimi.”

Mom “What’s that noise?”

Me “The cat. The one that never makes any noise.”

It was a long drive home.

Kimi wasn’t too sure about our house, since until two days prior, she’d been the pet of a house-bound, elderly person who doted on her and only her. Our house was slightly more chaotic, as she was plunged into the middle of three cats and two ferrets and people who didn’t sit down quite so much.

Still, it didn’t take her long to claim Chad as her human, although she obviously had some stiff competition from the entrenched cats who had also lay claim to him as #1. 

When it was warm, Kimi demanded to go outside, spending her time meeting and charming our neighbors. She had quite the little fan club in the neighborhood. We received more than one call that she was trying to get into other folk’s homes! More than once as Chad was collecting her, he would have a neighbor stop and ask, more or less, if Kimi really had to go home now.

Possibly my favorite Kimi story started off with a simple idea. Since life with cats means life with litter pans, we decided that it would be best to put the litter pans in the basement and install a cat door for access. We went with a door that had a release triggered by magnets on the cats’ collars.

Unfortunately:  1. Our cats did not understand the cat door and 2. No amount of cramming the cats through the cat door was helping to make them understand.  

We still harbored hopes that the cats would figure the system out we left the magnets on their collars, even after the flap was removed. Since Kimi would go outside on nice days, we had a delightful new game of guessing what she would bring attached to her magnet – a nail, screws, washers, usually small items. The day she came strolling awkwardly home with a tuna can lid dangling between her front legs, we took the magnet off!

Kimi patiently outlived all her siblings and was finally, in 2015, the sole kitty of our house, much to her relief. She had waited 7 long years to once again be the only cat in her house. Queen of the Castle! No feline competition! And then a little stray tortie kitten found Chad.

Poor stoic Kimi dealt with this intrusion as she had with all the other new siblings she’d endured during her life with us. She patently ignored her, despite the kitten’s overtures to make friends. Eventually they came to an understanding which appeared to be sometimes Kimi wanted to chase kitten, other times she pretended kitten did not exist. It seemed to work out for both of them pretty well.

Kimi was a simple and loving cat who only wanted a nice lap and someone to love her. We hope we passed muster. Godspeed smug one, we miss you! Your sister Nyx misses you, too.

 

chris on November 21st 2018 in Animals, Family

Trossachs and Farewell – July 12

On Thursday morning, I hit the wall. I was tired of packing, unpacking, shuffling, repacking. I was cranky (maybe a little bit unhappy as our trip was coming to an end). It didn’t help that the room had been a million degrees and the shower kept randomly dripping through the night. You know what Scotland doesn’t have a lot of? Air conditioning!

Anyway, there I was cramming stuff into the suitcase for the next to the last time (Hooray!) so we could head back towards Edinburgh.

Chad thought that it would be nice to take a meandering drive through The Trossachs since the weather was iffy, instead of planning something that could be spoiled by rain. The carrot he dangled to captain grumpy here, was that we could get some geocaches along the way. There was one problem with that carrot – I didn’t have data on this trip. While I could download the caches, once we were in the car I didn’t have maps to help me to figure out where the caches actually were, all I could see was that they seemed to be right off the road.  Only there was no access point – turns out there was a long trail that we couldn’t see. So much for that idea!

The Trossachs were lovely. Although by this time I was tired and anxious to just be done with the driving portion of our day.

We did stop at Loch Cho for a geocache. At which time I was attached by midges.

It was awful! Loch Cho was quite nice, though.

Not long thereafter we found ourselves back in Edinburgh strolling along the Royal Mile to the Jolly Judge, which greatly improved my mood! Also, it was Cider Fest/Tap Take Over!

My mood was further improved by having some fancy gin drinks and dinner at Holyrood 9A before heading to our hotel to re-pack for the last time.

So long Scotland, you were lovely as always. We’ll be back. And next time we won’t move every night. For real this time. For real.

chris on July 12th 2018 in Travel

Eigg-o-rific – July 11

EIGG DAY 2

We awoke to the distinct sounds of rain on the skylight. It was early and bright – because that’s how it is here. I looked at Chad who had clearly been awake for a while. “I’m not hiking An Sgurr today.” He didn’t seem exactly disappointed.

The only thing we really had planned today was to meet Gabe, one of the Laig Bay brewers at the Brewery. We had no idea where it was. So, we put on our still damp clothes, packed up and biked down into town, seeking additional sustenance and hot beverages, plus directions to the Brewery.

Once fortified with fresh backed biscuits and other delicious things, we hopped on our bikes and headed out. Unfortunately, I didn’t understand where we were going and Chad who had gotten directions, was having a bit of a time navigating using the map on hand.

After a few misadventures we realized that A. we were going in the wrong direction but B. we were close to Massacre Cave – so we went to Massacre Cave.

The story is, the islanders would hole up in this cave in times of trouble. So, when another clan came to take vengeance, all 300 inhabitants of the island ran to their hide out. Unfortunately, the invaders knew of it and set a fire at the (quite small) mouth of the cave, effectively suffocating everyone. So, good stuff!

There was another couple just coming out of the cave when we arrived, they announced that it was dry once you got through the first bit. So in we went!

It was really neat, although I have a hard time imagining 300 people huddled inside.

Now, onward to the Brewery. I may have mentioned earlier that I haven’t really done much biking in years. Riding this bike UP and down hills, and over lumpy trails was rough. I was soaked with sweat. All I could think about was getting off the bike, drying off and putting on my jeans (those hiking pants were getting pretty ripe).

FINALLY at long last we were there. Oh sweet Jesus. And then we had to climb a gate. You’ve got to be kidding me.

Gabe was super nice and chatted with us for a while, sending us back with four bottles of beer. And here I thought I was going to lighten my pack by leaving him the beer we’d brought!

We still had plenty of time before the ferry arrived, so we struck out for the ruin of the township of Upper Grulin  which was settled probably between the 18th & mid-19th centuries and cleared in 1853 to make way for sheep.

To get there we pedaled through a sheep fold. The sheep were unimpressed with our biking, as was I to be honest. At the gate we abandoned our bikes and headed the rest of the way on foot. I was so happy to ditch that thing. Oh my gosh I am so out of biking shape!

We walked past an old bothy that was in the process of being renovated. We’d try to rent a similar one for our stay, but were out of luck.

The ruins were quite grown over, but still easily visible. Chad picked a little pinnacle and after settling in, I read about the area so we knew what we were seeing – aside from stone walls and a great view of An Sgurr.

Like just about every other spot we’d been on the island, it was beautiful and lovely and worth hanging around for a while. Which we did. (Not in small part because I did not want to have to get back on that bike any time soon.)

After returning to the port and finally turning our bikes in, we sat outside (with what was probably half the island) and had a Laig Bay Brewing beer (or maybe two) waiting for the ferry to come in.

Thank you, Eigg. It has been a true joy. With An Sgurr still to be climbed and quite a few places left unexplored we will most certainly be back!

 

chris on July 11th 2018 in Travel