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Hotspur.us https://hotspur.us the Matlick's home on the web Sun, 26 Apr 2020 00:19:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2 Farewell, Yeti, our loveliest Marshmallow https://hotspur.us/farewell-yeti-our-loveliest-marshmallow/ https://hotspur.us/farewell-yeti-our-loveliest-marshmallow/#respond Thu, 16 Apr 2020 00:18:30 +0000 https://hotspur.us/?p=9025 It’s a very sad day in our house, and the bookending of an era, as we send off our loving, gentle boy Yeti.

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Our most patient, gentle, soft sweet Yeti, Signor Pants, the Pantaloni, Bestest of Marshmallows, lived a long, good life – reaching 8+ years with us, which is quite an accomplishment for a ferret – let alone one from the streets (literally) of Pittsburgh.

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Yeti and his brother Sasquatch has been found surviving with a feral cat colony in Pittsburgh, during the previous winter. Sasquatch clearly had been taking care of Yeti, who was deaf, making sure he was safe until – and after – they were rescued. While his brother had interested adopters, poor Yeti had not one and they were definitely a bonded pair – so much the better for us!

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We brought the boys home on December 19, 2015, and I immediately declared that those idiots who weren’t interested in adopting my sweet Yeti because he was a deaf Dark Eyed White were absolute morons! He provided many solid hours of cuddling for the humans, which is not standard ferret behavior! Not only that, he was the paragon of patience dealing with his new sister who hated everyone who was not her brother Duncan, in stride.

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Being such a calm, relaxed dude, who happened to be deaf, Yeti was a great ambassador ferret! He enjoyed going to the multitude of parades that Morgantown hosts (god we host a lot of parades). 

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went to Arts Walks,

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Block Parties,

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the Farmers Market, the Ferret Frolic…you get the picture! He was always happy to be held by folks and have his photo taken.

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Our big Marshmallow was a great traveler, preferring to sleep in his hammock as we rolled up or down the interstate until we reached our desination. He quite enjoyed his vacation Black Water Falls, where he got into the cabin’s cold, but cinder filled, fireplace rendering him mostly more grey than white!

About a year ago, Yeti, now solo, graciously accepted a tiny little white peanut named Inanna into his life. She was a lunatic, but he made sure to make her feel welcome and safe, curling up with her as she acclimated into our home.

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A few months after that, he went with us to meet and pick up his troublesome baby brother Fenris. The big ol’ Pantaloni comforted the baby on his first night away from his mom and siblings as we all tried to sleep in a hotel room. Yeti was a great big brother, again making sure the newcomer felt safe.

On Wednesday, April 15, our Yeti left this world. It was his time. He’d had a long, full life, had many ferrety adventures and been a great ferret ambassador and big brother. After eight years, it was his time. We did our best by him, but it doesn’t make it any easier to say goodbye. With his passing, we’ve now closed another chapter in our ferret people saga.

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Godspeed, my boy. Your brother is waiting.

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Fenris Doombringer https://hotspur.us/fenris-doombringer/ https://hotspur.us/fenris-doombringer/#respond Sat, 15 Jun 2019 22:01:49 +0000 https://hotspur.us/?p=9013 It’s high time we introduce the newest member of the household. On June 15 Chad and I (and Yeti who came along for the trip) welcomed Fenris Doombringer into our family. 

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This handsome little hob is from Scarlett’s Happy Dookers Ferretry in Ohio.

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He is the loviest little boy. 

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Super sweet, wants our attention in the most adorable way.

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Fenris is very good with our old man Yeti, curious but not bothersome. And now Inanna has a playmate that can keep up with her WAY better than the humans. Now she’s the one being run ragged! He’s already outgrown her! Welcome home, little man! 

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Blackadder – the costume(s) https://hotspur.us/8941-2/ https://hotspur.us/8941-2/#respond Sat, 15 Jun 2019 00:09:53 +0000 https://hotspur.us/?p=8941 In 2000 I made Chad an Elizabethan costume. It was based on the BBC series, Black Adder. I only did it because Chad foolishly said, “if you make that, I’ll wear it.” Pffft. Challenge accepted.

My resources to replicate said costume were:

  1. Grainy VHS tape that was probably a copy of a copy
  2. Some photo copied & self-published books about how to make men’s Elizabethan costumes
  3. A few costuming web sites
  4. Some sketches I made from said VHS tape while it was on pause
  5. Janome sewing machine
  6. Babylock serger that scared the hell out of me

Surprisingly, the costume turned out OK. I’m not saying this to humble-brag. I’m saying this because my level of costuming skill at the time would rank as pretty darn low and technically lacking. I was self-taught – both sewing in general and definitely costume in particular, had no idea how to properly scale up or down a pattern, and was recreating from blurry photos. Let’s be honestly, I was mostly winging that mother.

 

The next year, I made a few modifications and updates. The slops got better for sure. Although I still had (or currently have) no real idea how I’m supposed to use that serger. 

Over Halloween our headless horseman was brazenly stolen off the porch. He was wearing the jerkin, doublet and sleeves – the most integral pieces of the costume.  

I was livid.

And yet, by then I’d made Chad a newer, fancier, slightly better gold Elizabethan costume.

It was no Black Adder, but it was pretty nice. And had been very time consuming.

Several years later with some more costuming experience, I decided to start from scratch. Historical garment resources had come a long way in 11 years. I decided the best place to start was a new chemise, which was the easy part. Although I still sucked at scaling patterns and dealing with fitment issues. I was, however, much better at muddling through via mock-ups in cheap muslin! A hard earned lesson, believe me.

Chemise done, a new set of neck and wrist ruffs were in order. There was a lot of conflicting and confusing info out there regarding construction. So I picked what seemed to make sense (having already gone through several different ways of making them) and machine embellished the 260 inches of fabric. At the very least, it was gonna be a huge upgrade from his original ruff. 

At which point I stopped,  pinned the ruffs into sections, put it aside “for a few days” and there it lay. Forgotten in a corner, a distraction for a different day.

Eight years later I decided it was time to review my costuming closet, make some alterations and perhaps see about that Black Adder costume again.  After all, costuming references had gotten a lot better since 2011!

I was off to the races – the turtle races.

Step 1: Locate and wash ruff material

Step 2: Find newer, better reference – a 44 page .pdf with photos and diagrams!

Step 3: Spend unnecessary amount of time on Pinterest looking up Black Adder

Step 4: Spend a week going back and forth about adding black trim to ruff material (see above)

Step 5: Spend 2 days searching craft stores for appropriate trim

Step 6: Start hand stitching trim to 260 inches of ruff material

 

To be continued, in hopefully less than 8 years.

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Hello, Inanna! https://hotspur.us/hello-inanna/ https://hotspur.us/hello-inanna/#respond Sat, 01 Jun 2019 18:39:11 +0000 https://hotspur.us/?p=8937
 
A few weeks before vacation, an instant message popped up from a ferret club member wanting to know if we would be interested in a white ferret that had just come into a rescue.

We’d been thinking about bringing home a youngster, partly as a playmate for Nyx (so she’d leave poor Yeti alone) and partly because there is nothing so joyful as a young ferret running around like an idiot! 

Chad happened to be out of town but I sent him a message with her picture. He said if we could wait until after we got back from vacation he didn’t see why not.

Little Miss Inanna joined the family on May 6. Operating under the assumption that she was as big as Yeti, since she looked huge in the photos, I took along the boys dog crate to pick her up. well that was a mistake because as soon as I saw her I thought crap this is not going to work. But then again maybe it would so I tucked Inanna into the crate and off I went. 
 
Approximately five minutes later while in traffic, I caught a blur of white out of the corner of my eye on the floor of the passenger side! I hit the brakes reached down and missed! So I threw my bag in her general direction scaring the tiny ferret to the back seat.
 
 
Fortunately her next foray to the front of the car was under my seat! It took a little bit of dexterity since I was driving, but I managed to nab her without wrecking. Holding a very bouncy little ferret in my hand, I drove to a pet store and buy a much smaller carrier! 

Our timing was not great for bringing home the little one. By then we knew we were losing Sasquatch. But when the Universe offers you a ferret, you take the ferret.
 
Welcome to the chaos, wee beastie! 
 
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Sasquatch, Our Biggest of Boys https://hotspur.us/sasquatch-our-biggest-of-boys/ https://hotspur.us/sasquatch-our-biggest-of-boys/#comments Thu, 16 May 2019 00:05:28 +0000 https://hotspur.us/?p=8918 Dark clouds swept over our house last week as we had to send off our sweet boy Sasquatch

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Our biggest of boys, Sasquatch, ‘Squatch, Squatchmo, Big Dude, Bubbies, Champagne Supernova, Squatchers, Big Squatch, came into our home December 19, 2015, along with his brother Yeti, from the Hide-E-Hole ferret shelter in Pittsburgh. (You can thank Chad for talking me into their names.) I’d always wanted a big boy ferret and he certainly fit the bill!

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The boys had been found surviving with a feral cat colony in Pittsburgh, during the previous winter. Sasquatch clearly had been taking care of Yeti, who was deaf, making sure he was safe until – and after – they were rescued. When we first brought them home they would sleep curled up together in a sleepy sack. Sasquatch would always have his head out, alert for any danger. Anytime they were in an unfamiliar situation, Sasquatch would revert back to that behavior, making sure Yeti was protected.

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Once they settled in, ‘Squatch demonstrated his propensity for being a low-key sorta dude. He was happy to go outside and play in the grass and check out the fish pond and waterfall. Big Dude wasn’t exactly the most graceful ferret, and more than once wound up in the pond! He might dance across the waterfall, try to step on a lily pad, despite my warnings, and plop! At least he was a proficient swimmer!

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Among Squatchmo’s other outdoor hobbies was trying to steal the water irises. Not really sure what he planned on doing with them, but he would seek out a nice plump water iris, streeeetch until he could get it, and yank (if it was out in the water) or chew on it, if it wasn’t. It was ridiculous!

Like most ferrets, he was a a master digger, flinging dirt far and wide when he was able to sneak into a plant, or when presented with a box full of soil. But at the Ferret Picnic when a prize was on the line, do you think he’d dig? Of course not! Silly boy. Being patient, though, he was a great contestant in the Ferret Chariot Race! Even when I wrecked the chariot and dumped him overboard!

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We very nearly lost Sasquatch in December 2017. And so we knew we were on borrowed time. I only wish we’d been able to borrow more.

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Sasquatch was a happy, lovey, stunning boy who left us far too soon. He was the Big Boy I’d always hoped for and our life is richer for having had him in it. Rest in peace, my Champagne Supernova.

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Moab – April 18 https://hotspur.us/moab-april-18/ https://hotspur.us/moab-april-18/#respond Thu, 18 Apr 2019 14:29:20 +0000 https://hotspur.us/?p=8954 So long Salt Lake City, you seemed nice, but we’re not here for the city, we’re here for the better stuff.

While planning this trip, all I kept hearing and reading was that it was going to be near impossible to get into Arches National Park….it was high season, it was Spring Break, it was the week leading up to Easter. So basically, don’t make any plans that hinged on getting into Arches. So we didn’t. But we did figure that since we’d be passing right by the entrance on the way into Moab, we’d take a look. And if the line wasn’t too bad, we’d go for it.

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THERE WAS NO LINE!

In fact, people were streaming out of the park!

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Neither of us really had any idea what to expect beyond arches in general. So we thought we’d wet our feet with a 2 mile out and back hike on the Park Avenue trail; and what a introduction to Arches! It was gorgeous, and lovely and so unlike any other place we’d ever been. Huge slabs of red rock and off in the distance snow-capped mountains.

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Next Up: Balanced Rock. Yes I know you’ve seen billions of photos, big deal it’s a rock balanced on another rock. But A. it’s right off the road B. there’s a virtual geocache and really C. it is cool. I will say that even this early in the tour of National Parks, I ready to do some full body tackling of the jackasses who blatantly ignored the signs to stay off the damn rocks and stay on the trail.

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Onward to Delicate Arch viewing area. It was HOT. And we weren’t sure how much else we’d be able to see – all those warnings about no place to park! – so we thought we’d check it out from afar first. But before that, a parking lot snack, on the sidewalk in front of the car while ravens eyeballed us and waited for us to spill. Also, time to switch to shorts.

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After checking out Delicate Arch from afar, Chad suggested we head out to Landscape Arch instead of hiking out to Delicate Arch, since we had technically seen it. And you couldn’t see Landscape Arch unless you walked out to it.

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So, just to let you know, walking on sand is terrible. And there is a lot of sand in Utah. A LOT. Anyway.

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You wouldn’t think anything quite so large as Landscape Arch could visually sneak up on a person. You would be wrong! Or at least in my case, it snuck up on me. Behind the arch is a rock wall, so as we approached there wasn’t the telltale bit of sky or light coming through the arch, it was visually deceptive. Until it was extremely obviously just there!

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What is even more crazy, is that until 1991 you could just pretty as you please walk right up to it and hang out under it. Which is what was going on when some folks thought they heard thunder…until they noticed some small rocks falling and then a huge slab broke free! Needless to say, you have to keep your distance a little bit now.

Because it was so long, it was really difficult to get a good photo, which is pretty much why we go see these things for ourselves. This was clearly a trip where the photos we took were going to be used to jog our memory, more than memorialize what we were seeing.

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It was starting to approach dusk and honestly the last thing I wanted to do was to try to set up our ultra light tent, that was had not used since our trip to Colorado several years prior, at civil twilight. We’d booked a little campground in downtown Moab – yes, downtown by a creek – called Up The Creek Campground. It was quite nice and the price was right!

What we discovered as we unfurled the tent and set up camp, was that we’d clearly never cleaned the tent properly cleaned the tent post-Colorado. As if we needed a head start on the sand collection!

I see that I failed to mention one important thing about Moab and our timing. It was Easter Jeep Safari Week (not to be confused with Discount Lion Safari). Which for some reason had escaped my noticed when I went into vacation triage mode and arranged the logistics of this trip. It certainly makes sense about the accommodations being difficult to find and insanely expensive – please see our decision to camp in Moab.

There were literally Jeeps EVERYWHERE. All shapes, makes, models, sizes. Sock. Lifted. Modified. Crazy modified that you couldn’t really tell it had been a Jeep. Falling apart (pretty sure that Willys was a legit WWII relic and it looked in about the same condition as the one we saw in Cambodia). Brand New.

As if I wasn’t overstimulated enough having gotten into Arches at first go and now here I was surrounded by Jeeps. Be still my heart. 

Clickity click on the thumbnails to see more photos in big form!

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Salt Lake City – April 17 https://hotspur.us/salt-lake-city-april-17/ https://hotspur.us/salt-lake-city-april-17/#respond Wed, 17 Apr 2019 14:09:09 +0000 https://hotspur.us/?p=8952 It’s weird starting vacation on Wednesday.

The 3:30am alarm, which thankfully Chad turned off before it made that terrible noise, was as usual, FAR TOO EARLY.

WE did manage to leave the house by 4am. Which got us to the car place with plenty of time to spare.

Hooray for airport bars that recognize sometimes you need at drink at 6am.

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The flight was uneventful and short enough that I was awake when we passed over some spectacular mountains. Obviously this trip is to the desert, but a good mountain range always makes me happy. This one was quite lovely. 

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We arrived into Salt Lake City, as did all our luggages thankfully, since we had crammed all our camping gear into checked bags. Headed to get the rental car and I was immediately, “Uh no. THAT is not what I reserved.” A Hyundai Kona? What in the world is that tiny little car? I specifically rented a small AWD vehicle because we were going to the middle of nowhere Utah. This thing has about zero clearance and only slightly more luggage space.

Chad turned to me and asked, “Do you want me to go back and get the minivan they tried to upgrade us to?”

No. I did not. And car rental agencies, stop trying to sell a minivan as an upgrade. No one wants your stupid minivan unless they have 401 babies, which we certainly do not. That’s why there are always extra minivans available.  At any rate, so much for doing any baby jeep trails in Moab in this thing.

We stopped at Red Iguana (from Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives fame) for lunch. Looked SUPER sketchy on the outside. Totally yum and totally packed. Thank you, Google!

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As we were leaving the restaurant, we caught sight of this….

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Since it was far too early to check in to our hotel, we headed downtown Salt Lake City. The mountains were majestic. Rising up and ringing the City. Clearly my memory of here during the cross-country drive in a Ryder truck with Dad and Uncle Dan did not imprint on me that it was in a basin.

We took in the capitol – quite lovely – which left me wheezing and I was more than a little confused until Chad pointed out that we may be in a basic, but we were still quite a bit higher in elevation than at home. Ah.

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It was lovely to see everything in bloom and nice and green. We walked around the giant block of Mormon, reading the historical markers which were everywhere. At least we now know what’s up with the beehive image all over the place.

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Finally headed to the hotel for some much needed down time and an amazing sunset. Good job, Utah. We like you already! 

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The rest of the photos here…..clickity click to embiggen! 

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Farewell, Kimi cat….you were a good girl https://hotspur.us/farewell-kimi-cat-you-were-a-good-girl/ https://hotspur.us/farewell-kimi-cat-you-were-a-good-girl/#respond Thu, 22 Nov 2018 01:00:46 +0000 https://hotspur.us/?p=8790 It is with heavy hearts that we say goodbye to our smug, (mostly) silent, ever patient, loving, Siamese kitty Kimi.

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It was ten years ago that Mom called me and asked if I could go get Kimi and take her home…temporarily. Nun-Nun, Kimi’s human, had just gone into a nursing home and poor spoiled, only pet Kimi needed someone to pay attention to her. I knew full well that temporarily meant permanently because that’s how these things tend to go.

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Down to Fairmont I went only a few days before Christmas, gathered up Kimi the Silent and put her into the cat carrier. She started wailing like a banshee.

I called Mom from the car, “Hey, I have Kimi.”

Mom “What’s that noise?”

Me “The cat. The one that never makes any noise.”

It was a long drive home.

Kimi wasn’t too sure about our house, since until two days prior, she’d been the pet of a house-bound, elderly person who doted on her and only her. Our house was slightly more chaotic, as she was plunged into the middle of three cats and two ferrets and people who didn’t sit down quite so much.

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Still, it didn’t take her long to claim Chad as her human, although she obviously had some stiff competition from the entrenched cats who had also lay claim to him as #1. 

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When it was warm, Kimi demanded to go outside, spending her time meeting and charming our neighbors. She had quite the little fan club in the neighborhood. We received more than one call that she was trying to get into other folk’s homes! More than once as Chad was collecting her, he would have a neighbor stop and ask, more or less, if Kimi really had to go home now.

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Possibly my favorite Kimi story started off with a simple idea. Since life with cats means life with litter pans, we decided that it would be best to put the litter pans in the basement and install a cat door for access. We went with a door that had a release triggered by magnets on the cats’ collars.

Unfortunately:  1. Our cats did not understand the cat door and 2. No amount of cramming the cats through the cat door was helping to make them understand.  

We still harbored hopes that the cats would figure the system out we left the magnets on their collars, even after the flap was removed. Since Kimi would go outside on nice days, we had a delightful new game of guessing what she would bring attached to her magnet – a nail, screws, washers, usually small items. The day she came strolling awkwardly home with a tuna can lid dangling between her front legs, we took the magnet off!

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Kimi patiently outlived all her siblings and was finally, in 2015, the sole kitty of our house, much to her relief. She had waited 7 long years to once again be the only cat in her house. Queen of the Castle! No feline competition! And then a little stray tortie kitten found Chad.

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Poor stoic Kimi dealt with this intrusion as she had with all the other new siblings she’d endured during her life with us. She patently ignored her, despite the kitten’s overtures to make friends. Eventually they came to an understanding which appeared to be sometimes Kimi wanted to chase kitten, other times she pretended kitten did not exist. It seemed to work out for both of them pretty well.

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Kimi was a simple and loving cat who only wanted a nice lap and someone to love her. We hope we passed muster. Godspeed smug one, we miss you! Your sister Nyx misses you, too.

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Trossachs and Farewell – July 12 https://hotspur.us/trossachs-and-farewell-july-12/ https://hotspur.us/trossachs-and-farewell-july-12/#respond Thu, 12 Jul 2018 20:39:11 +0000 https://hotspur.us/?p=8750 On Thursday morning, I hit the wall. I was tired of packing, unpacking, shuffling, repacking. I was cranky (maybe a little bit unhappy as our trip was coming to an end). It didn’t help that the room had been a million degrees and the shower kept randomly dripping through the night. You know what Scotland doesn’t have a lot of? Air conditioning!

Anyway, there I was cramming stuff into the suitcase for the next to the last time (Hooray!) so we could head back towards Edinburgh.

Chad thought that it would be nice to take a meandering drive through The Trossachs since the weather was iffy, instead of planning something that could be spoiled by rain. The carrot he dangled to captain grumpy here, was that we could get some geocaches along the way. There was one problem with that carrot – I didn’t have data on this trip. While I could download the caches, once we were in the car I didn’t have maps to help me to figure out where the caches actually were, all I could see was that they seemed to be right off the road.  Only there was no access point – turns out there was a long trail that we couldn’t see. So much for that idea!

The Trossachs were lovely. Although by this time I was tired and anxious to just be done with the driving portion of our day.

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We did stop at Loch Cho for a geocache. At which time I was attached by midges.

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It was awful! Loch Cho was quite nice, though.

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Not long thereafter we found ourselves back in Edinburgh strolling along the Royal Mile to the Jolly Judge, which greatly improved my mood! Also, it was Cider Fest/Tap Take Over!

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My mood was further improved by having some fancy gin drinks and dinner at Holyrood 9A before heading to our hotel to re-pack for the last time.

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So long Scotland, you were lovely as always. We’ll be back. And next time we won’t move every night. For real this time. For real.

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Eigg-o-rific – July 11 https://hotspur.us/eigg-o-rific-july-11/ https://hotspur.us/eigg-o-rific-july-11/#respond Wed, 11 Jul 2018 19:31:34 +0000 https://hotspur.us/?p=8747 EIGG DAY 2

We awoke to the distinct sounds of rain on the skylight. It was early and bright – because that’s how it is here. I looked at Chad who had clearly been awake for a while. “I’m not hiking An Sgurr today.” He didn’t seem exactly disappointed.

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The only thing we really had planned today was to meet Gabe, one of the Laig Bay brewers at the Brewery. We had no idea where it was. So, we put on our still damp clothes, packed up and biked down into town, seeking additional sustenance and hot beverages, plus directions to the Brewery.

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Once fortified with fresh backed biscuits and other delicious things, we hopped on our bikes and headed out. Unfortunately, I didn’t understand where we were going and Chad who had gotten directions, was having a bit of a time navigating using the map on hand.

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After a few misadventures we realized that A. we were going in the wrong direction but B. we were close to Massacre Cave – so we went to Massacre Cave.

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The story is, the islanders would hole up in this cave in times of trouble. So, when another clan came to take vengeance, all 300 inhabitants of the island ran to their hide out. Unfortunately, the invaders knew of it and set a fire at the (quite small) mouth of the cave, effectively suffocating everyone. So, good stuff!

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There was another couple just coming out of the cave when we arrived, they announced that it was dry once you got through the first bit. So in we went!

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It was really neat, although I have a hard time imagining 300 people huddled inside.

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Now, onward to the Brewery. I may have mentioned earlier that I haven’t really done much biking in years. Riding this bike UP and down hills, and over lumpy trails was rough. I was soaked with sweat. All I could think about was getting off the bike, drying off and putting on my jeans (those hiking pants were getting pretty ripe).

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FINALLY at long last we were there. Oh sweet Jesus. And then we had to climb a gate. You’ve got to be kidding me.

[See image gallery at hotspur.us]

Gabe was super nice and chatted with us for a while, sending us back with four bottles of beer. And here I thought I was going to lighten my pack by leaving him the beer we’d brought!

[See image gallery at hotspur.us]

We still had plenty of time before the ferry arrived, so we struck out for the ruin of the township of Upper Grulin  which was settled probably between the 18th & mid-19th centuries and cleared in 1853 to make way for sheep.

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To get there we pedaled through a sheep fold. The sheep were unimpressed with our biking, as was I to be honest. At the gate we abandoned our bikes and headed the rest of the way on foot. I was so happy to ditch that thing. Oh my gosh I am so out of biking shape!

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We walked past an old bothy that was in the process of being renovated. We’d try to rent a similar one for our stay, but were out of luck.

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The ruins were quite grown over, but still easily visible. Chad picked a little pinnacle and after settling in, I read about the area so we knew what we were seeing – aside from stone walls and a great view of An Sgurr.

[See image gallery at hotspur.us]

[See image gallery at hotspur.us]

Like just about every other spot we’d been on the island, it was beautiful and lovely and worth hanging around for a while. Which we did. (Not in small part because I did not want to have to get back on that bike any time soon.)

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After returning to the port and finally turning our bikes in, we sat outside (with what was probably half the island) and had a Laig Bay Brewing beer (or maybe two) waiting for the ferry to come in.

[See image gallery at hotspur.us]

Thank you, Eigg. It has been a true joy. With An Sgurr still to be climbed and quite a few places left unexplored we will most certainly be back!

[See image gallery at hotspur.us]

 

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